Making Sure All the Kids Get Music

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by Jan Seides
Wednesday 25th June, 2014, 10:13pm

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Every once in awhile I get a call from a mom or dad who has recognized an interest in music in their son or daughter, and would like them to take lessons. It seems they have a little electronic keyboard, or what amounts to a toy guitar that an uncle gave for a birthday, or sometimes not even that. But the child has been picking out tunes on the piano at church, or at someone else’s house.

 

I personally believe that every child should receive some kind of music instruction, and I have lots of scientific evidence regarding the benefits of music education to make my opinion pretty unswerving (The abstract from one such paper is below. If you’d like to see the whole thing, just email me through this site, or request it in the comments section, and I’ll send it). But in order for them to get any benefit from lessons, private or not, they must have some way to practice.

I used to refer the parents to the band or choir director at school, if they didn’t have any instruments at home. And up until recently, there was time made weekly for instruction in music, art and physical education. (When I was in the school system, there were music and art classes twice a week, and PE every day.) But lately, a lot of the school boards across the country have been pulling the reins back on a lot of activities they consider “frivolous”, music, art and PE being in the vanguard of those headed to the chopping block. You’ll hear claims about the budget, mandates coming from higher up, or the like. But the fact is, despite all the various studies, there is still a strong belief among those controlling the agenda that those activities should happen outside of school.  That they are “extra” and “unnecessary”. I find that horrifying to say the least, as I know it means that not every child will be exposed to a skill that is increasingly important as their education continues. Or doesn’t.

In some cases, those things can happen outside of school, it’s true. If the parents have money for it, or the time and attention it requires for someone’s child to learn a complex skill at home. But sometimes not.

We are fortunate in our town to have the University of Texas, with its Butler School of Music. For a long time there have been programs like the String Project, that not only trains children as young as 3, but supplies instruments to them as well.  And I’ve been told there is a new program of free piano lessons taught by University students. So, if the parents can get the kids there, an opportunity exists.

But the other day, I was browsing articles about music in general from all over the country, and I ran across this one:    Ministry seeks musical instrument donations at Dana Point festival

The article describes the charitable work of a couple in Orange County, CA. They collect used instruments from the community and pass them along to children who otherwise could not access them.

What a brilliant idea, and so easily duplicable in communities across the US. Don’t you agree?

Now all they need is teachers to donate a little time. Anyone?

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Category: Music, Teaching Music, This ‘n’ That, Uncategorized

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